Blog Posts from May, 2015

Very Short Blog Posts (28): Users vs. Use Cases

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

As a tester, you’ve probably seen use cases, and they’ve probably informed some of the choices you make about how to test your product or service. (Maybe you’ve based test cases on use cases. I don’t find test cases a very helpful way of framing testing work, but that’s a topic for another post—or for further reading; see page 31. But I digress.)

Have you ever noticed that people represented in use cases are kind of… unusual?

They’re very careful, methodical, and well trained, so they don’t seem to make mistakes, get confused, change their minds, or backtrack in the middle of a task. They never seem to be under pressure from the boss, so they don’t rush through a task. They’re never working on two things at once, and they’re never interrupted. Their phones don’t ring, they don’t check Twitter, and they don’t answer instant messages, so they don’t get distracted, forget important details, or do things out of order. They don’t run into problems in the middle of a task, so they don’t take novel or surprising approaches to get around the problems. They don’t get impatient or frustrated. In other words: they don’t behave like real people in real situations.

So, in addition to use cases, you might also want to imagine and consider misuse cases, abuse cases, obtuse cases, abstruse cases, diffuse cases, confuse cases, and loose cases; and then act on them, as real people would. You can do that—and helpful and powerful as they might be, your automated checks won’t.