Blog: What Exploratory Testing Is Not (Part 2): After-Everything-Else Testing

Exploratory testing is not “after-everything-else-is-done” testing. Exploratory testing can (and does) take place at any stage of testing or development.

Indeed, TDD (test-driven development) is a form of exploratory development. TDD happens in loops, in which the programmer develops a check, then develops the code to make the check pass (along with all of the previous checks), then fixes any problems that she has discovered, and then loops back to implementing a new bit of behaviour and inventing a new check. The information obtained from each loop feeds into the next; and the activity is guided and structured by the person or people involved in the moment, rather than in advance. The checks themselves are scripted, but the activity required to produce them and to analyze the results is not. Compared to the complex cognitive activity—exploratory, iterative—that’s going on as code is being developed, the checks themselves—scripted, linear—are trivial.

Requirement review is an exploratory activity too. Review of requirements (or specifications, or user stories, or examples) tends happens early on in a development cycle, whether it’s a long or a short cycle. While review might be guided by checklists, the people involved in the activity are making decisions on the fly as they go through loops of design, investigation, discovery, and learning. The outcome of each loop feeds back into the next activity, often immediately.

Code review can also be done in a scripted way or an exploratory way. When humans analyze the code, it’s an unscripted, self-directed activity that happens in loops; so it is exploratory. We call it review, but it’s gathering information with the intention of informing a decision; so it is testing. There is a way to review code that involves the application of scripted processes, via a tools that people generally call “static testing tools. When a machine parses code and produces a report, by definition it’s a form of checking, and it’s scripted. Yet using those tools productively requires a great deal of exploratory activity. Parsing and interpreting the report and responding to it is polimorphic, human action—unscripted, open-ended, iterative, and therefore exploratory.

Learning about a new product or a new feature is an exploratory activity if you want to do it or foster it well. Some suggest that test scripts provide a useful means of training testers. Research into learning shows that people tend to learn more quickly and more deeply when their learning is based on interaction and feedback; guided, perhaps, but not controlled. If you really want to learn about a product, try creating a mind map, documenting some aspect of the program’s behaviour, or creating plausible scenarios in which people might use—or misuse—the product. All of these activities promote learning, and they’re all exploratory activities. There’s far more information that you can use, apply, and discover than a script can tell you about. Come to think of it… where does the script come from?

Developing a test procedure—even developing a test script, whether for a machine or a human to follow, or developing the kind of “test” that skilled testers would call a demonstration—is an exploratory activity. There is no script that specifies how to write a new script for a particular purpose. Heard about a new feature and pondering how you might test it? You’ve already begun testing; you’re doing test design and you’re probably learning as you go. To the extent that you use the product or interact with it, bounce ideas off other people, or think critically about your design, you’re testing, and you’re doing it in an unscripted way. Some might suggest that certain tools create scripts that can perform automatic checks. Yet reviewing those checks for appropriateness, interpreting the results, and troubleshooting unexpected outcomes are all exploratory activities.

Supposing that a programmer, midway through a sprint, decides that she’d like some feedback on the work that she’s done so far on a new module. She hands you a bit of code to look at. You might interact with the code directly through a test tool that she provided, or (say) via the Ruby interpreter, or you might write some script code to exercise some of the functions in the module. In any event, you find some problems in it. In order to investigate a problem that you’ve discovered, you must explore. You must explore whether your recognition of the problem was triggered by your own interaction with the program or by a mechanically executed script. You’re in control of the activity; each new test around the problem feeds back into your choice of the next activity, and into the story that you’re going to tell about the product.

All of the larger activities that I’ve described above are exploratory, and they all happen before you have a completed function or story or sprint. Exploratory testing is not a stage or phase of testing to be performed after you’ve performed your other test techniques. Exploratory testing is not an “other” test technique, because it’s not a technique at all. Exploratory testing is not a thing that you do, but rather a way that you work (and think, and act), the hallmarks being who (or what) is in control, and the extent to which your activity is part of a loop, rather than a straight line. Any test technique can be applied in a scripted way or in an exploratory way. To those who say “we do exploratory testing after our acceptance tests are all running green”, I would suggest looking carefully and observing the extent to which you’re doing exploratory testing all the way along.

4 Responses to “What Exploratory Testing Is Not (Part 2): After-Everything-Else Testing”

  1. Olaf Lewitz says:

    Awesome!
    Thank you for this important clarification:-)
    Still I think we benefit from the term in a more specific sense: doing things with a system that we haven’t thought of doing before.

    Michael replies: This series is a description of what exploratory testing is not. For a description of what exploratory testing is, for now see http://www.developsense.com/resources.html#exploratory. I’ll also be updating some of those ideas at the end of this series of posts.

    So while you describe “every activity of an explorative mind” that in some way “checks or tests if something is wrong here”, there’s still an important difference between “all of our scripted checks that we exploratively devised passed” and “we tried all we could come up with to break it and it didn’t”:-)

    Take care
    Olaf

    Thanks for the comment.

  2. [...] Exploratory Testing Is Not (Part 2): After-Everything-Else [...]

Leave a Reply